Monday, 27 June 2016

Bridge Daughter by Jim Nelson

Sponsored post: I received a digital copy of this book for free on a read-to-review basis. Thanks to Kindle Scout.
Bridge Daughter
Blurb (from Goodreads):
Young Hanna thinks her thirteenth birthday will be no different than the one before—until her mother explains the facts of life. Hanna is a “bridge daughter,” born pregnant with her parents' child. In a few months she will give birth and die, leaving her parents with their true daughter.
A mature bookworm who dreams of college and career, Hanna is determined to overcome her biological fate. Navigating through a world eerily like our own, she confronts unyielding attitudes and instinctive fears as old as humankind itself.
Then Hanna learns of an illegal procedure that will allow her to live to adulthood…at the cost of the child’s life.

Bridge Daughter by Jim Nelson

My rating: 3 of 5 stars


Bridge Daughter “Your mother wants the child you’re carrying. That’s the motherly instinct, one of the strongest instincts in the world. I’ve never heard of a mother seeing it any other way.”


This was a YA dystopian story, about a girl who was pregnant with her parent’s child.

Hanna was an okay character, and I felt quite sorry for her that she was having her life taken away from her. It seemed quite harsh the way her parents hadn’t prepared her for what would happen to her, although she was lucky in the way that she had been taught to read whilst other bridge daughters weren’t.

The storyline in this was about Hanna discovering that she was a bridge daughter – that she was carrying her parent’s child, and that when she delivered it she would die. And about how she wanted to not carry the baby and not die, even though she didn’t seem to have much choice in the matter. I did wonder at times where the story was going though, as it seemed like the outcome was pretty obvious.

The ending to this was okay, although it was very predictable. I wanted a different ending, just because it would have been surprising.



6 out of 10

No comments:

Post a Comment