Sunday, 28 September 2014

Poisoned Apples: Poems for You, My Pretty by Christine Heppermann

Sponsored post: I received a digital copy of this book for free on a read-to-review basis. Thanks to HarperCollins and Edelweiss.
Poisoned Apples: Poems for You, My Pretty
Blurb (from Goodreads):
Every little girl goes through her princess phase, whether she wants to be Snow White or Cinderella, Belle or Ariel. But then we grow up. And life is not a fairy tale.

Christine Heppermann's collection of fifty poems puts the ideals of fairy tales right beside the life of the modern teenage girl. With piercing truths reminiscent of Laurie Halse Anderson and Ellen Hopkins, this is a powerful and provocative book for every young woman. E. Lockhart, author of We Were Liars, calls it "a bloody poetic attack on the beauty myth that's caustic, funny, and heartbreaking."

Cruelties come not just from wicked stepmothers, but also from ourselves. There are expectations, pressures, judgment, and criticism. Self-doubt and self-confidence. But there are also friends, and sisters, and a whole hell of a lot of power there for the taking. In fifty poems, Christine Heppermann confronts society head on. Using fairy tale characters and tropes, Poisoned Apples explores how girls are taught to think about themselves, their bodies, and their friends. The poems range from contemporary retellings to first-person accounts set within the original tales, and from deadly funny to deadly serious. Complemented throughout with black-and-white photographs from up-and-coming artists, this is a stunning and sophisticated book to be treasured, shared, and paged through again and again.


Poisoned Apples: Poems for You, My Pretty by Christine Heppermann

My rating: 2.5 of 5 stars



Poisoned Apples: Poems for You, My Pretty(Source: I received a digital copy of this book for free on a read-to-review basis. Thanks to HarperCollins and Edelweiss.)

This was a collection of fairly odd poems, and it all got very repetitive as the book went on.

Basically every poem in here was about eating disorders and being over-weight, and while I could maybe put up with that for a short while, it all just got too much. I mean how many times do we need to hear about girls comfort eating? How many times do we have to hear about throwing up or not eating at all? I mean the first couple of poems got the point across, so the rest were basically repetitive and redundant. Considering how few words there were in this book, it certainly seemed to drag on a long time.

I’m not even going to pretend to know anything about poetry, so I can’t give you any idea of how poetic or technically brilliant these poems were, but I can tell you that as a reader of YA fiction, this just didn’t cut it for me.
5 out of 10.


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